Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Conservative Christians Endorse Roy Moore for U.S. Senate


Conservative Christians Endorse Roy Moore for U.S. Senate

By Julio Severo
Alabama, one of the most conservative states, will hold a special election for the United States Senate on December 12, 2017, which will decide its conservative course.
Famous conservative Christians are, in a list of endorsements, supporting the staunchly and publicly Christian former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore, a conservative famous for his advocacy for the Ten Commandments and traditional marriage that has enraged the left. He fought hard to keep Alabama from being forced to accept gay “marriage.”
The list of endorsements of Moore includes noted Christian leader and adviser to four presidents Dr. James Dobson, and martial arts champion and action movie superstar Chuck Norris.
“It is my pleasure to be among the many solid conservatives who are supporting Judge Roy Moore’s candidacy for the United States Senate,” Dobson, founder of Focus on the Family, said. “I’ve known Judge Moore for over 25 years, and I know him to be a man of proven character and integrity. I often ask God to raise up men and women of faith who will govern the nation with biblical wisdom. I believe Judge Moore to be such a man for this time.”
Dobson said that as a “private individual, I am honored to endorse Roy Moore for the United States Senate, and pray that his election will be the start of a new generation of leaders who will return this nation to the constitutional principles upon which it was founded.”
In his endorsement, Chuck Norris said of Moore: “He’s tough, tested and has a spine of steel. The Washington establishment knows they won’t be able to count on him, but Alabama voters can.”
Norris said Moore “has never backed down from standing for what is right, and that’s exactly what he’ll do in the U.S. Senate.”
“That’s why the Washington establishment is spending millions trying to defeat Judge Moore,” he said.
“Alabama needs Judge Moore there doing what he’s always done: fighting to protect our constitutional rights to life, religious liberty, and the freedom to protect ourselves and our families. And he will always put principle over politics,” Norris said in a statement released by the Moore campaign.
Other names in the endorsement list are: Mike Huckabee, former Gov. of Arkansas; Sean Hannity, host, The Sean Hannity Show; Brian Brown, President, National Organization for Marriage; Sarah Palin, former GOP Vice Presidential Nominee, former Gov. of Alaska; Steve Bannon, 2016 Trump Campaign Manager, former Chief Strategist to President Trump; Matt Barber, founder, Editor-in-Chief, BarbWire.com; Julio Severo, author of Prophetic Prayers; and many other names.
Yes, I have also been honored to be invited to add my name as a supporter of Judge Roy Moore, and I gladly do it, because of his extraordinary conservative and Christian qualities. It is so hard to find excellent conservative Christian candidates and when you find one, you cannot afford to lose the opportunity to support him.
Last year, Moore shared, in his Facebook, my conservative article against homosexual propaganda.
To see the complete list of endorsements of Moore, click on this link.
Moore was elected chief justice in Alabama, then removed by a federal court after he installed a Ten Commandments monument in the state judicial building. He then was re-elected to the same position but removed as the result of a politically motivated campaign by left-wing opponents of his defense for traditional marriage and his opposition to gay “marriage.”
He would be a powerful conservative voice in the U.S. Senate, since he’s not known for compromising his beliefs. He contends America needs to return to the values of the Bible, declares Islam is dangerous, believes homosexuality should not be welcome in the military and maintains that marriage is the union of a man and a woman.
Charisma, the biggest Pentecostal website in the world, said, “Judge Roy Moore is the real deal, a Bible-believing Christian and a constitutional originalist who lives the values he campaigns on and will not be intimidated or bought by the Washington establishment. We urge all our conservative-populist friends in Alabama to unite behind Roy Moore, and all our readers across the country to support his campaign.”
Breitbart, headed by former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, has made electing Moore a priority.
Yet, President Trump has chosen to support a Moore opponent, Luther Strange, who is backed by the Washington establishment.
With information from WND (WorldNetDaily), Charisma News, Roy Moore organization and Business Insider.
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Sunday, September 17, 2017

Rex Humbard, Premier Televangelist Who Blessed Millions


Rex Humbard, Premier Televangelist Who Blessed Millions

By Julio Severo
The first time Rex Humbard met Elvis Presley, “the King of Rock and Roll” asked the televangelist a pointed question:
Rex Humbard
“The Lord’s coming soon, isn’t he?”
Maude Aimee Humbard, Rex’s wife, said to Presley, “I’ve been praying that you would dedicate your life to Jesus Christ.”
“Elvis went to pieces,” Humbard wrote. “He cried so hard he began to tremble.”
Humbard wrote that he and his wife joined hands with Presley and prayed for him. Then, at the end of the meeting, Presley said, “You and Maude Aimee coming here today and praying with me is the most wonderful Christmas present that Elvis Presley has ever received, and I want to thank you.”
The relationship between the televangelist and the late music icon is explained in Humbard’s book, The Soul Winning Century, The Humbard Family Legacy… 100 Years of Ministry 1906-2006, published in 2006 by Clarion Call Marketing of Dallas.
Humbard preached a sermon at Presley’s funeral in 1977 in Memphis.
According to the New York Times, “Elvis Presley was a loyal viewer” and admirer of Humbard.
Even though coming from a background as a gospel singer in the Assemblies of God, Presley draft away from the Gospel. He began to get interested again in the Gospel only through the simple message of Humbard, a charismatic televangelist.
Presley attended no church and Humbard’s program became his weekly service. Just as Presley, millions of people did not attend any church, or because they were not Christian or any other eventuality.
“The vast majority of people do not go to church and the only way we can reach them is through TV,” Humbard wrote in his autobiography, “Miracles in My Life.”
“We must go into their homes — into their hearts — to bring them the gospel of Jesus Christ.”
The special slogan of his program was “You Are Loved!”
His program became an important service even in Brazil. There was a time when my mother had no church near to go, and Humbard’s program was our only church service and encouraged us as nothing else did.
Rex Humbard was the first evangelist to have a weekly national television program in America. His program combined some elements of popular entertainment with evangelism, an approach also followed by Billy Graham. They were pioneers in combining preaching and music.
In spite of the modern approach, he said to his audience, “What America needs is an old-fashioned, Holy Ghost, God-sent, soul-savin’, devil-hatin’ revival!”
Humbard’s grandchildren singing in his TV program
His program was very pro-family: Humbard, his wife, children and grandchildren sang Christian songs in each program.
Humbard began his career in broadcasting at age 13, singing gospel songs on radio. He was ordained during the 1940s and in 1949 he began airing his sermons from a CBS-TV affiliate in Indianapolis, when the visual medium was largely untapped by evangelists. In 1952, weekly Sunday messages began broadcasting from his nondenominational Cathedral of Tomorrow, a renovated theater that seated 5,400 people, in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio.
Later, his program, carried by more than 2,000 TV stations and broadcast in some 77 languages, featured revival preaching mixed with lively musical numbers, including folksy guitar music and songs performed by Humbard, a choir, and guest performers such as Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash.
In the last 1970s, B.J. Thomas, a popular singer, appeared in Humbard’s show, telling his testimony of conversion to Jesus Christ and singing Christian songs. After Elvis Presley, B.J. Thomas was probably the most famous American singer in that generation.
At its peak of popularity in the 1970s, Humbard’s program attracted some 20 million viewers.
His ministry eventually extended to Canada, Europe, the Middle East, Far East, Australia, Latin America and Africa, giving it a worldwide reach of 8 million viewers, greater than any of his contemporaries by the late 1970s. In Brazil, he attracted large crowds at the giant soccer stadium in São Paulo for weeks.
Critics of televangelists often accuse: “Why are not televangelists going to preach the Gospel in faraway poor nations?” Rex Humbard did it. He spent millions of dollars, of the donations from his U.S. supporters, to have a Christian program reaching Africa, Brazil and Latin America.
Poor nations could not afford his program. Even so, U.S. supporters donated to helped Humbard to reach these nations.
“One of the distinctions of Rex Humbard’s ministry is the popularity maintained in South American countries, especially Brazil, where during a recent crusade appearance in Rio de Janeiro, more than 180,000 people filled a soccer stadium to hear the word of God,” according to Fort Worth Star Telegram.
“Seek the Savior,” Humbard would urge, “and all other moral problems will solve themselves.”
Humbard’s Sunday television program premiered in Brazil in the old Tupi Network, currently SBT, in 1975. This program, which was the first major charismatic influence in Brazil and began when there was no charismatic (neo-Pentecostal) church in Brazil, drew soon the attention of evangelicals from different denominations, and when Humbard visited Brazil for the first time in 1978, 80,000 people filled the Pacaembu stadium, in São Paulo, and 100,000 filled the Maracanã stadium, no Rio de Janeiro.
Humbard family in Brasília, Brazil
Subsequently it was broadcast by Manchete TV until 1984, when it went offline because of lack of financial resources.
In one service alone, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, more than 180,000 Brazilians attended the one televised crusade meeting and over 100,000 came forward to dedicate their lives to Christ. In the South American crusades, over one million people attended in person to hear the family sing and Rex bring the word.
In his crusades, he would ask: “How many of you here believe in Jesus Christ? Let’s see your hands.” A sea of hands would rise.
Last month, my Portuguese blog received this message from a reader:
“Today, August 8, 2017, as a 57-year old man reviewing my papers and an old picture of him [Humbard] and wife and children dated February 1978, I had the curiosity to see (know) on internet news about my spiritual father wondering if he still was in this our material world, but I learnt about his passing 10 years after. On October 1977, I was a teenager when I began to watch on TV Pastor Rex Humbard, and I fell in love with his messages. I was extremely Catholic in that time, but one day on October 1977 I was watching him in a very small TV set that my father had received as a gift from his boss, a kindhearted bank clerk. In this point the Holy Spirit touched me powerfully and I spent some three days silently and discreetly crying, so that my family would not perceive it. Afterwards, a Baptist minister explained to me that it was a conversion and, to sum up, from that point on my life experienced only victory.” — Deli, in Ibirataia, Bahia, Brazil.
Humbard’s reach was incredible. He had a major role in the expansion of the evangelical, Pentecostal and charismatic (neo-Pentecostal) movement in Brazil.
In 1977, 500 million heard or saw Humbard’s one-hour radio/TV gospel service broadcast from Jerusalem on Christmas Eve in seven languages simultaneously.
He was termed one of the “Top 25 Principal Architects of the American Century” by U.S. News & World Report on December 27, 1999.
Humbard grandchildren praising Jesus
Humbard not only witnessed a century of Pentecostal expansion, he contributed significantly to the growth of the worldwide Pentecostal and charismatic movement. It is doubtful whether Evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity would have spread as wide and as fast as they have during the past half century without the work of televangelists.
Televangelists, 1979. Left to right  Demos Shakarian, Billy Graham, Rex Humbard, and Pat Robertson.
Humbard paved the way for generations of televangelists, not only using television to spread his message but also building his own studio broadcasting facilities along with his church. And he kept up with advances in aviation, flying his staff to televised rallies all over the United States and Canada; by 1971 he had bought his third plane, a Lockheed Electra turboprop.
In the late 1960’s, Time Magazine came to Akron, Ohio, to meet with Rex Humbard in preparation for a feature story. The magazine’s editor-in-chief himself flew to Akron to write the story.
After meeting with Rex and his family for many days, he explained to Rex that he did not know what to call Rex and his ministry. As far as the editor-in-chief understood, Rex was a pastor, evangelist and a television preacher. When the article came out in print, the editor had chosen a unique phrase to describe Rex, referring to him as simply “the Tele-Evangelist.”
This was a totally new phrase, never before used to describe a television pastor.
Time magazine said, “Today, Rex Humbard has come closer than any other human being in history… to preaching the Gospel in all of the world… more than any other evangelist, he has taken up the challenge.”
His full name was Alpha Rex Emmanuel Humbard and he was a son of an itinerant preacher, Alpha E. Humbard, and Martha Bell Childers Humbard. When he was 2 days old, he said, his mother consecrated him to God’s service.
His father was born in 1890 near Little Rock, Arkansas, and he had a rough childhood. Poverty, fights, liquor, and hard work dominated the world in which young Alpha was reared. However, he sensed God’s calling at a young age and overcame the odds to answer this call. Alpha was a practical, direct, no-nonsense kind of preacher whose compassion for people overcame any deficit created by his lack of formal education. Perhaps it was this lack of high culture — combined with a dependence upon God — that allowed him to touch the masses where they were at.
Alpha once recalled that a seminary-trained minister bitterly complained that, while he was a learned man with good diction and degrees, he could not draw the crowds like Alpha, whom he described as “an old farm boy, a clodhopper who can’t talk good English.” Alpha recalled that he recommended that the minister throw away his cigar, which he was smoking while complaining, and get on his knees and pray. Alpha was not alone — his innovative, sometimes rough-and-tumble ways reflected a whole generation of early Pentecostal preachers.
He attended the Assemblies of God in 1914, but never joined that church. Alpha built up a thriving church, orphanage, and publishing house near Hot Springs.
Alpha’s group seemed not to espouse strange tongues as the initial evidence of the Holy Spirit, as taught by the Assemblies of God. This view would put him in par with modern charismatics, who do not see the gift tongues as the first evidence. It attracted independent-minded Pentecostals from across the nation.
It was into this Pentecostal entrepreneurial preacher’s family that Rex Humbard was born in 1919. In the summer of 1932, young Rex watched a Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus tent fill with crowds in Hot Springs. While he was not allowed to attend such “worldly” diversions, he did draw some heavenly inspiration from the event. He promised himself that he would “spend [his] life trying to put God on Main Street.” As he grew up, he saw how gospel music attracted crowds.
It should come as no surprise, then, that Rex met his wife, Maude Aimee, while singing gospel music. Rex not only impressed Maude Aimee, but also her pastor, Albert Ott of Bethel Temple Assembly of God. Ott brought the Humbards on staff at his Dallas church. Rex and Maude Aimee married in 1942 and traveled with the Humbard family ministry for the next ten years. Following a successful meeting in Akron, Ohio, Rex decided to leave the family ministry and to pastor a local church in 1953. The Akron congregation, Calvary Temple, was renamed Cathedral of Tomorrow when a large round building was erected in 1958. Seating 5,400 people, it became one of the largest churches in the United States.
Rex, like his father, did not teach initial evidence doctrine of the baptism in the Holy Spirit and emphasized evangelism rather than Pentecostal doctrines. This caused some confusion among some evangelicals and Pentecostals, who were uncertain which camp he was in.
Rex Humbard praying for prayer requests from viewers. Each program had room to pray for healing, salvation, deliverance and prosperity.
Humbard had not formal theological training, but this was no barrier for his powerful ministry. Although he lacked a theological degree, Humbard was ordained in Greenville, South Carolina, where the family had run a revival meeting, and received credentials from an organization of independent Pentecostal ministers.
Unlike Pat Robertson, Rev. Jerry Falwell and other televangelists, Humbard, as Billy Graham, avoided the political messages of the religious right. “For me to preach about the Vietnam War,” he said in the early ’70s, “would be like going to a blacksmith to get a tooth pulled.” If Jesus were preaching today, he said a decade later, “He would never get into politics.”
His television programs were essentially praise and preaching programs that highlighted God’s love and forgiveness and avoided controversial political or doctrinal debates.
Humbard family in Brasilia, Brazil
In spite of not declaring openly his conservative, Pentecostal stances, he was attacked for his conservatism. On November 12, 1978, “Fantástico,” the largest-audience TV show in Brazil, criticized Humbard, Billy Graham and Pat Robertson through the lips of Rev. William Sloane Coffin (1924-2006), a liberal and pro-sodomy Presbyterian minister, who was interviewed by “Fantástico” to portray U.S. televangelists in a bad light.
In 1998, Humbard told about the major influences in his life. He said:
In my more than 66 years of full-time ministry, four great religious leaders have had a profound impact on my life.
Dr. Billy Graham, who I have known for more than 50 years.
Oral Roberts, who in 1949 prayed the prayer of faith for the healing of our oldest son, Rex, Jr., who suffered from tuberculosis and was healed.
Kathryn Kuhlman, probably the closest friend my wife, Maude Aimee, and I have ever had, touched our lives in a wonderful and personal way.
Benny Hinn, who I have had the privilege of ministering with in his crusade meetings throughout the United States and Canada.
Humbard’s comment is a part of his introduction in the biography “Kathryn Kuhlman, Her Spiritual Legacy and Its Impact on My Life,” written by Benny Hinn. This Pentecostal biography was published by the originally Calvinist publishing house Thomas Nelson Publishers in 1998.
Kathryn Kuhlman (1907–1976) was no stranger to Calvinists. In the late 1940s, she held her healing services among Pentecostals and mainline Protestants, including at the First Presbyterian Church and at Carnegie Hall in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
One of the major sources for this article on Humbard was the book “The Century of the Holy Spirit: 100 Years of Pentecostal and Charismatic Renewal, 1901-2001,” written by Vinson Synan and published by Thomas Nelson Publishers.
Paradoxically, in 2013 Thomas Nelson Publishers published the book “Strange Fire,” by the radical Calvinist theologian John MacArthur, which misrepresented many experiences of Pentecostal televangelists as “demonic.”
Christians should avoid aggressive ministers who are busy attacking other Christians over petty issues. In the 1980s, I had several Humbard’s books, including on biblical prophecy and on how to be prosperous. I had received these books free of charge because, when I received them in the 1970s, I could not afford them. I kept them with me for years.
Among Humbard’s books there were: The Prayer Key New Testament, How to Live Life and Love It, Your Key to God’s Bank and many others. They were books encouraging supernatural experiences when there was no charismatic (neo-Pentecostal) church in Brazil.
Your Key to God's Bank: How to Cash Your Check for Spiritual Power, Physical Healing, Financial Success
Then came an Assemblies of God minister saying that Humbard was a “prosperity gospel” heretic and that his message was demonic and that I should burn his books. I did so, and today I am repentant from following his misguided advice. Two years after the radical advice, the Assemblies of God minister lost his ministry in a terrible scandal with a prostitute. In contrast, Humbard had never been involved in sexual scandals.
While anti-charismatic ministers accuse ministers like Humbard of exploiters and nothing else, the Rex Humbard ministry in Brazil had a wonderful policy that you could order books by paying whatever you could afford. If you could afford nothing, they would send you their books anyway. It is a generosity I never saw anti-charismatic ministers doing. It was through this generosity that I received Humbard’s books and I learnt.
Although Rex Humbard came from a Pentecostal background and sometimes he talked about prosperity, he did not emphasize such issue in his ministry. There was balance. The following statement was made by the director of public relations for his church: “The Cathedral of Tomorrow is not Pentecostal; neither is the pastor or any of the staff. Neither are we affiliated with any Pentecostal organization, and the magazine is not slanted at the Pentecostal message at any time. We are an interdenominational evangelistic church.”
The statement should not be interpreted to mean that the church was anti-charismatic, but rather that it was determined to avoid controversy. Prayer for the sick and anointing with oil were a regular part of the service, but the stress was always on the message of salvation. It was a formula that worked with a great deal of success.
Humbard (August 13, 1919 — September 21, 2007) was the most balanced charismatic preacher in his generation, and his ministry blessed millions.
With information from:
Catholic University of Pernambuco.
The Cambridge Companion to Pentecostalism (Cambridge Companions to Religion). Cambridge University Press.
New York Times.
Darrin J. Rodgers, in Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.
Britannica Encyclopedia.
Washington Post.
Christian Broadcasting Network.
Akron Beacon Journal.
George Thomas Kurian, Nelson’s Dictionary of Christianity: The Authoritative Resource on the Christian World, Thomas Nelson.
The New International Dictionary of Pentecostal and Charismatic Movements: Revised and Expanded Edition. Zondervan.
Encyclopedia of Religion, pages 7711-7712. © 2005 Thomson Gale, a part of The Thomson Corporation.
Christian Post.

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Thursday, September 14, 2017

Olavo de Carvalho’s 2017 Premiere “The Garden of Afflictions,” a New Age Movie


Olavo de Carvalho’s 2017 Premiere “The Garden of Afflictions,” a New Age Movie

By Julio Severo
“I give to students of my course an assignment: to be in a garden and lay down in the ground and be permeated by the universe’s presence above them and by the planet sustaining them,” said Olavo de Carvalho in the beginning of his movie titled “The Garden of Afflictions,” premiering in 2017.
Even though he also tried to fit a historical Christ and his sufferings in such garden, his emphasis was “in the universe’s presence,” a term quoted by him more times during the movie.
Interaction with the universe is a significant characteristic of the New Age philosophy, a movement born in the foundation in 1875 of the Theosophical Society, which mixed philosophy and spiritualism (esotericism, occultism). Helena Petrovna Blavatsky was the founder of the Theosophical Society.
The movie ends with a spiritualistic poetic tone, with Olavo de Carvalho saying:
“In my lifetime, I had never the impression that the dead are absent… My dear dead… I do not miss them, because they are present, they exist… Eternity is the current and simultaneous ownership of all our moments… What happened here, during a fraction of seconds, is in eternity.”
If, as he said himself, in his lifetime he had never the impression that the dead are absent, then his spiritualist concept only was adapted to Catholicism, in a syncretism very common in Brazil.
Would it be far-fetched to imagine a link between New Age and the direction of “The Garden of Afflictions”?
Reality points stronger connections than mere figment of imagination or coincidence. Movie director Josias Teófilo was already known as contributor in the magazine Sophia, a national publication in Brazil published by the Theosophical Publishing House.
Yet, connections do not stop here.
Teófilo has already lectured in several major theosophical lodges in Brazil, including Hope Theosophical Lodge, in João Pessoa; Sirius Theosophical Lodge, in Campina Grande; and also the Brazilian headquarters of the Theosophical Society, in Brasília. Just as other lecturers in the theosophical lodges, Teófilo has a degree in philosophy.
Following the example of Freemasonry, Brazilian theosophy calls its meeting places “lodges.”
In the Campina Grande lodge, Teófilo spoke about the importance of Helena Petrovna Blavatsky’s spiritualist vision on September 27, 2014.
In her best-selling book “The Hidden Dangers of the Rainbow: The New Age Movement and our Coming Age of Barbarism,” published in 1983, evangelical jurist Constance E. Cumbey said (page 29):
“A vast organizational network today, the New Age Movement received it modern start in 1875 with the founding of the Theosophical Society by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky. A basic teaching of this organization was that all world religions had ‘common truths’ that transcended potential differences. Strongly propounding the theory of evolution, they also believed in the existence of ‘masters’ who were either spirit beings or fortunate men more highly ‘evolved’ than the common herd. This was a doctrine which was to have a substantial impact on the development of Hitler’s Nazism several decades later.”
In the International Theosophical School held in Brasília on July 2012, Josias Teófilo delivered a lecture to youth in the workshop “Mysticism and Neoplatonism.”
Brazilian Theosophical Society
Neoplatonism is an esoteric philosophy unmasked by evangelical author Nancy Pearcey in her book “Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from its Cultural Captivity,” dedicating Appendix 2 “Modern Islam and The New Age Movement,” to address exclusively this subject.
Pearcey described New Age Islamic adherents’ passion for Plato and Aristotle. Among adherents, she mentioned René Guénon, a French Catholic who converted to Islamic esotericism.
Similarly, Olavo de Carvalho, who is considered the responsible for making Guénon known in Brazil, even having translated into Portuguese one of his books, is a promoter of Neoplatonism, which may, among other connections, have brought him near Teófilo.
Josias Teófilo: “Symbolism is exact sciences” — René Guénon
Guénon founded the Traditionalist School to promote an esoteric anti-Marxist conservatism.
Carvalho’s “conservative” and “anti-Marxist” base comes from Guénon’s Traditionalist School, who was one of the most prominent leaders of the New Age’s Islamic esotericism. To understand Carvalho’s esoteric base, read “What Draws Olavo de Carvalho to the United States?
Carvalho’s current supposedly “conservative” and “anti-Marxist” career is marked by many forecasts in the political realm. These forecasts, or handling of tips with several different and even antagonistic previsions, come from his experience and history as the founder of the first school of astrologers in Brazil in the 1980s.
Even today, the power of his astrological influence is so sharp that a Protestant teacher who became his hard-core disciple, fighting inflexibly Marxist indoctrination in the classroom, incurred into the severe fault of taking astrological indoctrination into the classroom. Last month, in a public Facebook post in Portuguese, she confessed that she frequently teaches her students to make astral maps. Because astrology is totally forbidden in the Bible, it is evident that the Protestant teacher did not learn this occultist practice in the Bible or Protestant churches. Because she is a prominent student in Carvalho’s “philosophical” class, it is evident the origin of her attitude of taking astrological indoctrination into the classroom.
It is not possible to separate Carvalho’s “political” forecasts from his New Age history, just as it is not possible to separate a New Age soul from “The Garden of Afflictions,” because its director is so involved in spiritualistic philosophies as the movie’s main character.
“The Garden of Afflictions” is more than a movie personifying Guénon’s anti-Marxist traditionalism. It is a personality cult of astrologer Olavo de Carvalho, directed by a Brazilian theosophist. No one better than an esotericist to speak of another esotericist.
By watching “The Garden of Afflictions,” the unsuspecting evangelical public suffers esoteric influences from its director and character.
Brazilian evangelical churches and publishing houses spent much of the 1990s warning about the dangers of New Age. If “The Garden of Afflictions” had been launched in that time, it would have been rightly identified as New Age propaganda, right in Guénon’s anti-Marxist traditionalist style. There is no lack of evidence to support such identification.
Today, Brazilian evangelical churches and publishing houses hardly talk about New Age stuff. Consequence? Even Pentecostal ministers are unconsciously recommending and promoting New Age.
On June 2017, Victorio Galli, an Assemblies of God minister and congressman, spoke at the floor of the Brazilian Congress to praise “The Garden of Afflictions.” Publicly, he also praised theosophist Josias Teófilo.
On July 2017, Marco Feliciano, an Assemblies of God minister and congressman, incurred in the same fault, publishing a public Facebook post tagging Carvalho and Josias Teófilo and asking his public to watch, like and share “The Garden of Afflictions,” which was recommended by him at the floor of the Brazilian Congress.
It is not the first time Feliciano has stumbled horribly. In early 2017, he recommended books by Paulo Coelho, an internationally famous New Age author.
Galli and Feliciano were “naiver” than Americans. In the premiere of the movie in New York in July, the American public did not appear. Just a few Brazilian immigrants did.
Even Americans who are members of the Inter-American Institute, headed by Carvalho, did not attend the premiere of his movie and did not recommend it.
“The Garden of Afflictions” is a New Age movie, from character to director. It is sheer propaganda of the anti-Marxist traditionalism that esotericist Guénon already promoted many decades before Carvalho. The only difference is that it has pinches of Carvalho’s Catholic syncretism but it does not make it different from most Brazilian Catholics. It is hard to find a non-syncretic Brazilian Catholic.
If we were in the 1990s, soaked in the Protestant world in exposés against New Age, “The Garden of Afflictions,” his character and director could not enter the churches and be praised by Assemblies of God ministers at the floor of the Brazilian Congress.
Yet, today Feliciano cannot identify the threat. New Age, in philosophical apparel, became stylish to them.
With “The Garden of Afflictions,” it became easy to enter Protestant churches and hearts. This occultist invasion happens in a time when the powerful American Left has recognized that the main conservative power in Brazil are evangelicals. Such fundamental acknowledgment is nonexistent in “The Garden of Afflictions,” because its greater mission is to promote his own syncretic Catholic character as the main power and intelligence in the Brazilian conservatism.
If even the American Left sees that evangelicals, who give glory to God, are making the real difference in conservatism, why did Feliciano prefer to give glory to a mere astrologer, who has distinguished himself for turning his Protestant disciples in mere syncretic religious individuals (as it is the case of the Protestant teacher adherent of astrological indoctrination in the classroom)?
If ministers like Feliciano do not perceive that they are being undermined, Brazilian evangelicals may become weak to continue leading the Brazilian conservative wave.
They need to read as soon as possible the article What Draws Olavo de Carvalho to the United States?” before the propaganda of “The Garden of Afflictions” turns them in mere fools in the service of New Age.
Portuguese version of this article: “O Jardim das Aflições,” um filme da Nova Era
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